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inspire us. i said no, mr. mandela, you inspire us. so there was this unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. we would say from time to time the struggle in birmingham, the struggle in selma is inaccept raable from the struggle in sharpville. >> one of the reasons i wanted to talk to you today congressman was reading about and thinking about and trying to understand the importance of those decisions made by mandela and other apartheid leaders after sharpville, when they decided non-violence was not enough, they have been so committed to nonviolence, even in the face of incredible brutality, they needed some sort of military response as well. never ended up being the khai part of their response to apartheid, but they made that hard decision. how international were those discussions about the importance of non-violence and whether or not it was enough to overthrow governments and to change the world? >> here in america and around the world, there was ongoing discussion about the way of peace, the way of love, the way of non-vi
to me, john lewis, i know all about you. i follow you, you inspired us. and i said, no, mr. mandela, you inspired us. so that was just unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. we would say from time to time, the struggle in birmingham, the struggle in selma is inseparable from the struggle in sharpville. >> one of the reasons i wanted to talk to you today, congressman, was reading about and thinking about and trying to understand the importance of those decisions that was made by mandela and other anc leaders and other antiapartheid leaders after sharpville, when they decided that nonviolence wasn't enough. they had been committed to nonviolence in the way that you have been so overtly committed to nonviolence, throughout your life, throughout those struggles, even in the face of incredible physical brutality, and they decided when they saw those people massacred, they needed some kind of military response as well. never ended up being a key response of their response to apartheid, but they made that hard decision. how interna
[inaudible] prepares forfrica a state funeral of unprecedented proportions, what kind of nation mr. mandela leaves behind. is possible to overcome hatred and anger in order to build a new nation and a new society. lson mandela went to prison and a great young man. committed to letting his enemies by violence if necessary. byfighting as enemies violence if necessary. 27 years later he emerged preaching. can say withf you authority and confidence that i have traveled this long road to freedom. fight, i madenot missteps along the way. [inaudible]e cross.y more hills to >> his longtime collaborator archbishop desmond tutu gave ask for a friend and global icon. >> thank you for the gift of madiba. him andu for watching enable us to know what we can become. >> for decades of struggle. the system applied violence and racist ideology in equal measure to oppress south africa's black majority and keep the white elite in power. but having won the battle he shared hiseid, victory with his former oppressors. >> his greatest legacy to south africa and to the world is the emphasis which he has always put
a state funeral of unprecedented proportions, what kind of nation mr. mandela leaves behind. is possible to overcome hatred and anger in order to build a new nation and a new society. lson mandela went to prison and a great young man. committed to letting his enemies by violence if necessary. byfighting as enemies violence if necessary. 27 years later he emerged preaching. can say withf you authority and confidence that i have traveled this long road to freedom. fight, i madenot missteps along the way. [inaudible]e cross.y more hills to >> his longtime collaborator archbishop desmond tutu gave ask for a friend and global icon. >> thank you for the gift of madiba. him andu for watching enable us to know what we can become. >> for decades of struggle. the system applied violence and racist ideology in equal measure to oppress south africa's black majority and keep the white elite in power. but having won the battle he shared hiseid, victory with his former oppressors. >> his greatest legacy to south africa and to the world is the emphasis which he has always put on the need for reconcilia
. act the work, he was jailed and stabbed, and killed at 39. mr. mandela struggling he was jailed for 27 years. and choosing reconciliation over retribution. so they both have that moral character about them. mr. obama, on the other hand, he was a benefactor. so he come as generation behind, but dr. kick, and mr. mandela, and and drink king were also trance forty figures. >> we just saw a picture of you, with one of my colleague morgan ratford who got the chance to meet nelson mandela for the first time. tell me about the man you knew? >> your know, i must say when i was in cape town south africa, my son and i met him at the door, and he immediately recognized me and called my name. i was just overwhelmed. he knew what was going on. he was alive and alert. he didn't just read the speech that day. he at was a great debate. every time we have a private conversation whether it's my office or my home, they always were overwhelmed by the and breadth of his concerning interest. he also did not owe his politics because of his popularity. he kept reaching out to cuba, and castro, and why are you
that mr. mandela brought about in south africa. my visit with him in '96, i had the privilege of spending nearly an hour with him in his office in south africa. the thing that struck me the most about mr. mandela, when you are in the presence of someone viewed by his countrymen as george washington, abraham lincoln and martin luther king it's intimidating. the thing that struck me is how open and engaging and humorous he was. we had a great time talking and laughing. i said to myself, an icon should not be this happy and laughing. you know, i expected a stone figure and i found a very -- >> doctor, can you reflect on how nelson mandela impacted those that you managed during your tenure at universities like howard? >> caller: sure. i was president of howard for 13 years. during that time, prior to my becoming president, mr. mandela received an honorary degree from howard. it was the first honorary degree he received from an american university. we are proud of that. mr. mandela, when i visited with him reminded me of his visit to washington and howard. he asked a question whether or not th
mandela. flags across the country remain at half-staff and will stay that way until mr. mandela is buried. michelle kaczynski is outside his home. tell us what you are seeing there. >> singing and dancing until at least 3:00 in the morning. even on the second day. i think what immediately strikes you and touches you is the incredible diversity of this crowd. people still coming together with their entire families and their friends. they will come here with a feeling of togetherness of truly moving sense of community. one boy 7 years old, drew a picture of house and trees. he drove here from a tiny village four hours away. she said a school was built. she said because of mandela, her child and the other kids there have a good education. plus, a huge pad of flowers on the gates lead to go mandela's home. people having their own gatherings. they will come here where they feel closer to mandela where he lived as well as closer to each other. >> michelle, we're having a little bit of trouble hearing your audio. i have to tell you what i love is how this nation, their mourning is so joyful. the
, actually the marque was a big part of it. it said welcome home mr. and mrs. mandela. there were a huge crowds here, more than 100,000 people, there was a huge parade. a lot of people we spoke to today found out about his death as they were leaving work, and seeing this marque. and for people here, his sit sit brought a bit of hope. a lot of people remember him riding by is pointing at the apollo theater. he just mentioned how his visit game hope. people just appreciated him making the stop, when he could have stop sod many other places. so certainly sadness, and a lot of fond memories coming from the people that were here those years ago. so jonathan -- what else is expected -- are there any events expected to happen at the apollo tonight? >> well, not tonight, like i said -- you just have started here. people are finally just stopping by, many people sharing memory as lot of people have stopped by to speak to us, and say i remember back in 1990 that we were standing -- we were here on top of the marque. some people remember being -- really at this point no sort of planned memorial, or
with us. mr. mandela's death comes at a period of deep unease, writes the new york tiles. the past year and a half, the country faces the most serious unrest provokeed by a wave of angry miner, a deadly response on part of police, messy leadership struggle and deepening fishers between south africa's ruler masters. members of the party have said mr. mandela's near saintly legacy from years of struggle has been eroded by a scramble of self enrich. . nelson mandela died with his family around him at a hospital. it was brought to us by the south african president. he was born in transic south africa. he moved to end the regime. the impact of his efforts reconciled generosity and to find the common ground between humanity's higher values and his own power. john carlin once described him and said he'll ultimately reach beyond south africa's borders. this coming to us from black borders. prior to doing so, mandela earned a bachelor's degree during which time he was elected onto the student's representative council and suspended from college for joining a protest boycott. he was eququalified i
's a street party that continues on now for several days since mr. mandela's death was announced on thursday evening here. the street has been filling with marchers, with choirs, with schoolchildren, with ordinary people who have come from far and near to be here, to be part of a celebration of mr. mandela's life. all of this is perhaps a day of anticipation because tomorrow about a mile or so from here, that huge soccer stadium that seats some 80,000 people, there will be countless people gathering to come to mourn, to come and breathe and celebrate mr. mandela's life. it may be the largest organization ever, perhaps rivaling the services for pope john paul ii when there were 70 heads of state, kings and queens. we are hearing there will bow 50 or 60 heads of state. leaders from as far away as new zealand and australia also coming here. although the american delegation, as you mentioned, which was scaled down based on the wishes of the south african government, they are trying to limit this. there is just a huge outpouring for mr. mandela and literally the world wants to be here. millions m
and since thursday night when mr. mandela's passing was announced. tomorrow will be truly significant and unique event. there are perhaps 95,000 people who will be allowed into the stadium and there will be tens and thousands more who will be try to be near there. the event of course is captivated the country and the world. security will be unprecedented. the south african security forces used protecting mr. mandela, the secret service and security forces here are sfam with protecting with mr. mandela. this is not an unknown island. of course, anything is possible about the they are taking unprecedented steps to make sure the stadium is secure. the treats in the area near here will be closing down in a couple of hours and private vehicles will not be allowed anywhere near the stadium. it is expected to be an emotional day. the program has just been released and there will be remarks by several of mr. mandela's grandchildren and comments from a former political prisoner along with him who served 26 years on rob bin island and remarks from heads of states like president obama and leader
forth that legacy. >> and you first met mr. mandela right after being released from jail. you were in a room alone with him. tell me about that moment. you're young, 20 and impressionable and looking for your place and 20 years later you would be the ambassador for south africa. what happened in that room? >> really pretty incredible to me and hilarious in retrospect. this was immediately after the ticker tape parade we had and i escorted him into city hall, and next i knew we were alone. i discovered in moments of silence, had a weightiness to him. i was probably staring at him awe struck for ten minutes then a voice said, young man, may i trouble you for a glass of water. he said it with a little slight i am patience and it became clear he probably asked several times but i was so dumb struck by him that my feet were rooted. of course, i hurried and got him water and never ever had such pleasure in providing service to another human being. i just wished i could have done more in his service and for his cause. >> we hear people say that nelson mandela is the moral compass for sout
mr. obama travelled to see the cell where mandela was held for nearly two decades. he described his relationship to the man he and many others affectionately called madiba. >> he is a personal hero and i don't think i am u meek in that regard. he's a hero for the world. >> back this south africa, the mood is part sadness, but part celebration. crowds gathered to remember nelson mandela who changed the world by committing his to the freedom of the south african people. >> i have nothing but deep gratitude they have given to me as an individual and let me state this. they were able to achieve anything, i know that this is because i am the servant of the people of south africa. >> it has been more than two decades since nelson mandela walked out of prison, but for those who lived through it, it seemed to be a piece of a larger puzzle. consider when mandela was freed, we were less than a year removed from china's tianamen square. the berlin wall came down the previous november. it was a fleeting moment in history, but for a time it showed humanity around the world was headed in the righ
with the country's leaders. those words lead the new york sometimes article that came out moments ago. mr. mandela spent 27 years in prison after being convicted of treason. by negotiating with captors after his release in 1990, mandela led the african national congress long a banned liberation movement to an lek to recall victory in 1994, first fully democratic election in that country's history. the new york times goes on, mandela served one term as the president and had not been seen in public since the year 2010 when the nation hosted the world cup soccer tournament. decades in prison and insist ens on forgiveness made him a potent symbol of the struggle to end the country's domination and power of peaceful resolution in even the conflicts. we are joined now on the live line, mrs. smith. a difficult day, one we had been informed would be coming. that doesn't make it easier. >> i think south africans are pleased. [ inaudible ] he was a healthy man the most of his life. the last year was painful for him. >> we've clearly lost the connection with mrs. smith her authorized biographer. she was spea
mandela. the man that shaiferre shared t. >>> the exquisite taste. i had the privilege to cook mr. mande mandela's first meal f captivity. ♪ >>> googood evening and thank yu for joining us i'm expwroz. joie chen. >>> but it was also designed to send a message t that the nation was serious about it's war on drugs. in the year since ho how howevey have come together to criticize the guidelines which limit judges gues discretion in handit sensentences. >> prosecutors can strong arm defendants into plea deals. a young man received a sentence that eastern even a judge call. >> 23 years eatio ago weldon waa father of two bhoi bhois boys aa budding record label. >> he was a total joke jokester. >> this is weldon's sister. inafge left he was also a smalle marijuana dealer. trans actions that let him down to this place the fed penitentiary where he has been incarcerated for a debl decade w rchl. >> while we talkin angela called for prison and talked about what led him there. i was young and dumb and it was a big mistake. >> a mistake that owe i e he isg dearly for. >> one of my childhood frien
courage changed the world. mr. mandela went from freedom fighter to political prisoner to president. >> his message of reconciliat n reconciliation, not vengeance, inspired people everywhere after he negotiated a peaceful end to the brutal segregation of black south africans and forgiveness for what the white government had done, oppressed them and imprisoned him. today, the world is remembering ali con. >> nelson mandela. nelson mandela. ♪ >> in south africa, the grieving and mourning are mixed with songs and celebration. for the man affectionately known by his clan name madibmadiba. remembering the life and legacy of any son mandela. i'm suzanne malveaux. >> i'm michael holmes. thanks for your company. it is interesting how much of a celebration it has been. there is the mourning. there were tears tonight. today it's been singing and dancing, people celebrating the life. >> he seems to have an impact on just about everyone. people around the world are reacting. we are watching live pictures of him being celebrated in the streets of johannesburg. died in the suburbs of johannesb
. mandela and mrs. mandela in the flat in london. it was a small apartment. we met and it was extraordinary. i was in the room with living history. i was in the presence of greatness. this man's humility about the combination, there is no question that nelson mandela was a man who embodied what martin luther king jr. talked about in referring to the spirit of the times. here was a man who was out of a sense of directioning history and those around him. a man who didn't presume to be the mouth piece for god. nevertheless spoke for millions of people not only in south africa, but around the world. the courage it took to for give south africa into its future. his love ethic that they spoke about was the predicate for the expansion of opportunity for africans who were black to join with africans who were white and others to forge the future of that nation. what's interesting as many criticize mr. obama here, president obama who was encouraged by him. i was at the white house when the film was screened. i had the opportunity to see barack obama introduce a film about nelson mandela was a bit of
. especially in the places nelson mandela touched. people are out in the streets. outside mr. mandela's formal house 20 miles from here. and outside his current home here in north johannesburg where he passed away. it may well be after midnight here but the crowds are still growing. there are hundreds here. the mood has changed quite rapidly to one of quiet shock to frankly boisterous celebration of his life. this is a typical almost uniquely south african reaction, greta. people of all colors, many who have wrapped themselves in the south african flag, some holding candles are toy toying, a revolutionary dance. they are singing his name. one young woman outside his home here is holding up a sign saying it's in our hands now. inside the house a large richly furnished home i have been lucky enough to enter many times to film mr. mandela, the former president was surrounded by family members as he passed away. it's widely believed that elders from his home village, mr. mandela was, after all, a deeply traditional man, are now going through rituals. in english, the ceremony they are going through
. i was the wife of a south african freedom fighter, belonged to a rival organization than mr. mandela's. my husband was a pat, pan african congress, mr. mandela was founder of anc, african national congress, others south african national union. i was used to those men and a few women shouting and screaming at each other. they were really arch rivals. when mr. mandela came, he didn't raise his voice. he didn't argue with anybody. he didn't put anybody down. they were rivals. i had never met a south african who wasn't shouting and really angry all the time. i know he was angry, but he didn't use his energy foolishly. so it was a year after that he was imprisoned. i became friends with his wife then, winnie mandela. and we continued to support each other over the years and over the oceans. and she would tell me how he was. he wasn't vitt uperative with t guards. i was part of hillary clinton's delegates when he was inaugurated. i sat there and watched the guards, who had guarded him for 27 years, sitting in the right sights, in the best seats, invited by mr. mandela. not to say look how
coming here throughout the past few days since mr. mandela's death was announced. they have been singing in the streets, they have been chanting. it's been more street party than anything else celebrating the life of mr. mandela. obviously there's also some grief and mourning but most people are trying to focus on the positive, the legacy and the tremendous achievement of mr. mandela and this country during his life. also you have to remember that all these events are taking place over a week. there's the memorial service tomorrow and then for the next three days after that, mandela's body will lie in state at the union builds, the seat of government in pretoria and the body will make a procession from the military hospital to that place each day so there will be people trying to line that route and see what's happening as well to visit the body and pay their respects. and finally the funeral in a distant part of the country where mr. mandela is from, so many events over many days and a lot of emotion overall that. >> ron, thank you. checking the news feed this morning, that massive wint
of the congressional black caucus and other circles as they have been noting tonight, lots of concerts in support of mr. mandela, lots of concerts in support of those who said that we should not have any dealings with south africa as long as apartheid was still in place. >> the people for sanctions were on the right side of history because it really did weaken the regime and probably brought them to the bargaining table much quicker. >> in your article, you noted south africa's economic and clinical aspects were intertwined. how so? how did he help to narrow that defined? had growth rates under 1% during the entire apartheid regime. from the time he was a like did until 2008 they were clipping along. that is an astonishing miracle and away. he did that by saying we want free markets. we will not nationalize the minds. we want everyone to be able to sort of compete in our economic system and to take heart. and theyted jobs opened up the labor force. they had a very strong affirmative action program which has worked very well there. they managed to get a lot of people. >> let's talk a little bit about hi
are one of the most humble person i ever met. i will tell you whether mr. mandela arrived today he said to our producer and said what is the subject of today's show? [ applause ] and she said nelson mandela. you are the subject of today's show. and he goes, oh, all right. >> she credits mandela as the inspiration for her school for girls in south africa. our coverage of nelson mandela's life and death continues later this half hour as we hear from mandela's jailer who describes their unusual and long-lasting friendship. you want to keep it here on abc news all morning long. >>> all right. we will turn to other major headlines beginning with something of a reversal by the white house involving the president's uncle who had been facing deportation from the u.s. omar and the president had never met but they said he lived with him three weeks while attending law school. it came after the judge ruled he could stay ignoring a deportationing order two decades ago. >>> libyan government says so far no one claimed responsibility for shooting an american teacher to death as he jogged through the
. your thoughts on nelson mandela. caller: mr. mandela was a man of peace. of forgiveness -- a man forgiveness. a man of inspiration to millions of people around the world. that the truly sad same cannot be said about the man who spoke about earlier today from the white house. noson mandela had divisiveness. he had no enemies. he had -- he did not desire to cause division. barack obama is low. nelson mandela -- host: thank you for your calls. lots of reactions from the former president, george w. bush issuing a statement. -- president obama shortly after the announcement of nelson mandela's death spoke to reporters on his thoughts on the passing of nelson mandela. >> at his trial in 1964, nelson mandela close to statement saying i have fought against white domination. i have fought against black domination. ahave cherished the ideas of democratic and free society in which all persons live together with equal opportunities. it is an ideal which i will hope to live for and to achieve. if needs be, it is an idea for which i'm prepared to die. nelson mandela lived for that ideal, and m
, he has a very close relationship with nelson mand a mandela. their lives are intertwined. mr. obama has said that his first political act as an individual was in support oh of the anti apartheid movement, which mr. mandela, of course, was leading. so there's that. we expect that this could be one of the largest gatherings of heads of states ever together assembled in one place. it's an event that will perhaps rival the funeral of pope john paul ii back in 2005. some 3 million converged upon the vatican. the numbers here at the football stadium where the main event will be held could be as many as 100,000 or so. there are several other venues in the johannesburg area where people will watch on giant televisions. and countless others will cram the streets to get near this area where there will be this huge event going on. and don't forget, after tomorrow, there are still three days of official mourning, where mandela's body will lie in state at the union buildings at the capital. and a final state funeral in qunu where mr. mandela was born and grew up. a week-long series of events, fu
earned the admiration of millions. >> and one wonders what must be passing through mr. mandela's mind at this moment. >> after 27 years in prison, nelson mandela walked into freedom. against all odds, the leader of a rebellion became the leader of national unity. mandela's decade-long rebellion turned him into a freedom fighter, an international hero. >> i fought against white domination. i have fought for every family. >> mandela was born into a privileged family. he supported nonviolence. he became a lawyer and opened the first african law firm. in 1960, mandela turned militant. >> there are many people who feel that it is useless for us to continue talking nonviolence. >> mandela loved up to his name, troublemaker, repeatedly challenging authority. he was convicted of sabotage and conspiracy to overthrow the government and sentence to life in prison. he was cut off from the outside world, but mandela's message and movement endured. his wife became his unofficial ambassador. finally, in 1990, nelson mandela was freed. >> mandela became south africa's first black president and
the thought originated. in the mind of mr. mandela and bishop desmond tutu, it was the recognition from our side and on the side of mr. mandela and his colleagues that to continue our hostilities and acrimony would mean the destruction of this country and would lead to a civil war that no one would wish to go. >> reporter: as botha recalls, mandela's message of peace predated the '90s in the early '60s following years of action against apartheid he made his famous speech at the dock that would lead to his imprisonment. >> he said, i afford against white domination. and i afford against black domination. i have challenged the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. and then he concluded by saying, this is an ideal i hope to live for and to achieve. but if needs be, it is an ideal for which i'm prepared to die. >> reporter: mandela was an icon. but he had a very human side, too. as botha was to find out when he reached out to mandela during his presidential years. >> mandela is no angel. no humans are angels. his secon
, nelson mandela will be laid to rest in south africa on december 15th. president and mrs. obama will be there to pay their respects. fox's ed henry just wrapped up an interview with bill clinton be who shared his memories of the leader. >> he talked to me in that prison cell as we grabbed the bars and looked out together about what it was like. and i said tell me how this changed you. how did you give up 27 of the best years of your life and come out a better man than you went? he said, i realized they could take everything from me except my mind and my heart. those things i would have to give them. he decided not to give them away. he was free before he was released. >> tributes have been pouring in over the last 24 hours. >> we've lost one of the most influential courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with us on this earth. >> extremely sad and traj ek news. we're just reminded what an extraordinarily inspiring man nelson mandela was and my thoughts and prayers are with him and his family now. >> a new low, low, low, loss of pain. he accompl
sanctions was the beginning of the he said. i met with mrs. thatchter day before mandela was set free and britain never broke from apartheid south africa. but the u.s. played the most significant role of any. i think, i was listening to brother doug speak. he chose a critical point. he had a chance for a very bloody south africa. but the unfinished business. and i think that reconciliation over retribution. we had a conversation about two years ago. we were talking. he said he had been the military leader. he felt nonviolence would not work there. he planned to blow up a hospital in desperation. he was captured just before that happened. he is glad he got caught. he would rather have spent 27 years in jail than to have the blood on his hands of innocent people. to me that is quintessentially him. he also made some tough decisions politically about his allies. he reached out to cuba. he reach out to libya. he tried to bring a nonaligned mission. ted global vision and very principled stands on those issues. >> and president obama only met nelson mandela once, i believe. there did seem t
of mr. mandela. that to continue our -- and echo them, would mean the destruction of this. it would mean to a civil war that no one would to go. >> as botha recalls, mandela's message of peace following years of action against apartheid, he made his famous speech that would lead to his imprisonment. >> he said that i have fought against one domination. and i have fought against black domination. i have cherished the idea of democratic and free society. all lift together and with equal opportunities. and then he concludes by saying this is the idea, i have to live for and to achieve. but it needs to be, it is an ideal for what i'm prepared to die. >> mandela was an icon, but he had a very human side, too, as botha would find out when he reached out to mandela during his presidential years. >> the second -- i think in march 1996 and got a message that he felt extremely lonely. so i phoned and he answered the phone. not the secretary. and i then conveyed my condolences and we -- to absorb this event now. and no empathy, friendship, only time first time he started to stop and he's a human be
was interviewed by ted koppel on night line and ted koppel leaned in and said, mr. mandela, the communist. they were the only ones that helped us. next question. >> you're talking about the controversial part, that he aligned himself with revolution areas like fidel castro, gaddafi and was briefly a member of the communist party. as you write about that in the book, he transcended that when he became president. he certainly didn't seem to follow -- and such. how did he do that? how did he transcend that? >> he believed so deeply in his cause. keep in mind what apartheid was like. here he had a small white minority that controlled the fast population and assets. south africa is a beautiful country with many, many assets. it was terrible what was going on there. i visited south africa more than once. i was there, my bride and i, and a small delegation from our administration. we were there in '91 as a guest. >> you met them there. you talk about the bitterness and lack of anger. he didn't go after his opponents. he started truth and reconciliation. >> isn't that something? truth and reconci
. >> the government has taken a firm decision to release mr. mandela unconditionally. >> reporter: mandela emerged behind bars without bitterness to resume his campaign. >> africa. >> nelson mandela set aside his personal freedom for our personal freedoms. >> reporter: as south africa's first black president mandela remained a humble man, taking delight in a new york ticker tape parade. dancing at a concert in his honor. meeting with world leaders and his civil rights hero. as promised he stepped down as president of south africa after serving just one term. >> be south africa has been a despottic state throughout almost the whole of the 20th century. mandela is one of the best and optimistic qualities that he has to the people of south africa. >> reporter: by all accounts the measure of this man can be taken by what he wants to be remembered for. here lies nelson mandela said, a man who has done his duty on earth. >> here with us now, a giant of civil rights. you got a chance to interview president mandela in february of 1990 after he came out of prison after 27 years. how did you finds him? how
comparisons with mr. mandela. mr. obama often noted privately and publicly that his sacrifices would never compare to mr. mandela's. aide to mr. obama said he was uncomfortable when people drew parallels between them as often as they did. this is from "the new york time times", not "the washington post." i apologize. how fair are those comparisons? they are inevitable and now we're going to continue to read and hear more about them over the next few days and weeks. how fair are they? >> it depends on which mr. mandela you're talking about. >> and which mr. obama you're talking about. >> one of the things that we talk about is mr. mandela as a tremendous humanitarian leader and so on. and he really was. but he was also a politician. and he also had to hold together a coalition, find the way to steer his country forward as the first black representative in that democratically elected government. in that way, they do have a great deal in common. you do see a very nervous and frightened group of white south africans wondering exactly what his presidency meant for them. and in some ways, you sa
us the background of that photo. >> mr. mandela came to the understand to attend the clinton inaugural. he was very close for the clinton family. in fact the clintons visited the mandelas early this year and last year, and when secretary of state clinton visited south africa before she left office, but he wanted to participate. he wanted to know more about how we ran campaigns here. he wanted to be part of the celebration, because he had a great deal of respect. and i was with my friend yolanda caraway to escort him to the inaugural ball. he wanted to see the city. >> former president clinton -- tweeted i'll never forget my friend madeiba, and you can see the love there. david cameron, the prime minister of britain is now speaking. i think we're going to try to fix that audio. once we do, we'll hear david cameron, the british prime minister. he's paying his respects over in london right now once we've fixed that technical problem, we'll hear what he has to say. he's paying his respects. i want to show our viewers some video. february 11th, 1990. right now a very, very special
was given to a meeting with mandela at the hospital, but even then, he was far too frail and mr. obama huddled instead with the family inside this compound. then brought him to the prison. mr. obama referred to mandela by his south african name of endearment. madiba. >> madiba's words give us a compass in a sea of change. >> with mandela's passing, the president said others must now hold his moral compass. >> it falls to us as best we can to form the example that he set. to make decisions guided not by hate, but by love. never discount the difference that one person can make, to strive for a future worthy of his sacrifice. >> president obama will travel to south africa for services for mandela and is expected to be one of many world leaders asked to eulogize the political prisoner who became president. >> colin powell witnessed an historic moment when mandela was sworn in. mandela's leadership that day set his country on a path to unity and inspired the world. the former secretary of state is in washington. general powell, good morning. >> good morning, charlie, how are you? >> remembe
, president reagan and u.s. policy was pro-white south africa and really, mr. mandela was on the terrorist list until july 1st, 2008, taken off by president george bush. until 2008 he was still on the terrorist list. >> he said some things that were very controversial. in 2002, mandela said as the debate about the war in iraq was beginning but before the war had launched, he said quote, if there's a country that has committed unspeakable atrocities in the world it is the united states of america. they don't care for human beings. now, obviously, there are lots of areas of american foreign policy that are ripe for criticism but to say the united states does not care about human beings does not seem to be a fair statement. how do you reconcile things like that that he said with the magnificence of his accomplishments and his forgiveness and everything great that he did? >> you know, we should be very humble in our approach about this, jake. 246 years legal slavery, 100 years of legal jim crow in our country, apartheid laws in this country gave rise to apartheid laws in south africa in 1948.
that mr nelson mandela visited atlan atlan atlanda -- atlant ageorgia and paid his respects. robert ray is at the historic site. >> we have a special privilege, al jazeera america does to be at the king site at downtown atlanta where martin luther king and his wife are buried behind me. june 27th, 1990, nelson mandela at the tail end of his american tour stopped here in atlanta. some of the first things he said when he got off the plane is it reminded him because of his home town of south africa, because of the landscape and warmth. it was a hot day. it was a whirl wind tour around the state of georgia, as he was escorted in a bulletproof limousine and brought out at three locations, morehouse college being one, where he was made an honorary morehouse man. after that, as you can see, the cameraman can zoom in, he was brought to this site where martin luther king is buried. nelson mandela lay a wreath. he was with his wife. he was put back into his limousine, stepped into the camera and brought to georgia tech's football stadium where 50,000 plus were in the stands waiting for him. one o
for the memorial service. some other world leaders who plan to attend for mr. mandela are the u.n. secretary-general ban ki-moon, david cameron, prince charles is going. the french president, francois hollande and even the cuban president, as we said he had ties with cuba in the past, raul castro, list goes on and on of dignitaries. >> of course, with president obama and three of his predecessors going to south africa, you can imagine what robin was talking about, and that is security and the kind of complex situation they're dealing with potentially a nightmare. secret service had very little time to prepare for the trip. athena jones is joining us at the white house. we're very much aware of what it takes. there's not a lot of advance work when you have the limited amount of time. air force one expected to touch down what, early tomorrow morning? >> early tomorrow morning. i think about 1:00 a.m., they'll be making a fuel stop on the way. bottom line, these are the kinds of trips that take weeks and months to prepare. this was compressed into a very short time line. the spokesman for the s
but not forgotten. ♪ free free nelson mandela >> mr. nelson mandela will be released. >> good evening. this is nelson mandela's first full day of freedom. >> reporter: released at the age of 72 in 1990. he remained ever vigilant that his country and its freedoms rested in the hands of the people. >> i stand here before you, not as a prophet. but as a humble servant. >> reporter: and for the people of south africa, mandela's release after nearly 30 years of imprisonment ushered in a new era of hope and the end of apartheid. >> today, the majority of south africans, black and white, recognize that apartheid has no future. >> reporter: in 1993, mandela, along with south africa's president, f.w. de klerk, won the nobel peace prize. and in 1994, mandela's dream was realized when black south africans cast their first ballots in a democratic election. and mandela became south africa's first black president. >> we are all south africans. we have had a good fight. but now, this is a time to heal the old wounds and to build a new south africa. >> reporter: after ruling for five years -- >> afri
before his burial. >> mr. mandela is also being remembered in the bay area. kpix5 shows us the celebration of mandela's life and legacy at a bay area church. >> reporter: when san francisco's glide memorial church remembered nelson mandela at their morning services the only thing missing was sadness. the mood was joyful as a children's choir honored the passing of the man being called the father of a nation. >> it's bigger than that. i mean, nelson mandela touched all of our lives regardless of where we were in the world. >> pastor williams met mandela twice, the first time at his celebrated appearance in oakland in 1990. williams says mandela's power came from his ability to rise above the outrage of his imprisonment, to become an irresistible force for peaceful change in the tradition of ghandi and dr. martin luther king jr.. >> being in prison for 27 years, you hear me? 27 years and then walking out of that prison as a new person completely. there's no doubt about it, he liberated the world in many ways. >> mandela was already in his 70s when he walked out of prison but
the president of the south africa, mr. nelson mandela. [applause] >> your majesties, your royal highnesses, distinguished guests, comrades, and friends, today, all of us do, by our presence here, and by our celebrations in other parts of our country and the world confer glory and hope to newborn liberty. out of the experience of an extraordinary human disaster that lasted too long must be born a society of which all humanity will be proud. our daily deeds as ordinary south africans must produce an actual south african reality that will reinforce humanity's belief in justice, strengthen its confidence in the nobility of the human soul, and sustain all our hopes for a glorious life for all. all this we owe both to ourselves and to the peoples of the world who are so well represented here today. to my compatriots, i have no hesitation in saying that each one of us is as intimately attached to the soil of this beautiful country as are the famous jacaranda trees of pretoria and the mimosa trees of the bushveld. each time one of us touches the soil of this land, we feel a sense of personal renew
government, under increasing pressure and isolated in the world, suddenly yielded. >> mr. nelson mandela will be released at the staff prison. >> reporter: it was an amazing moment when mandela walked out of prison. on february 11th, 1990. the world rejoiced. he worked with his former enemy to move toward free elections and the end of apartheid. he and frederik willem de klerk were jointly awarded the nobel peace prize in 1993 and the following year this, the world again looked on in wonder and joy as millions of black south africans lined up to vote for the first time. nelson mandela was elected president in a landslide. >> so help me god. >> reporter: a few months later at his inauguration attended by scores of world leaders, he declared a new era for his beloved country. >> never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another. >> reporter: terry moran, abc news. >> now what happens next is nelson mandela's body has already been moved to the hospital. he will be given a state funeral. not only that, but all of the flags will be at half
peacefully last night surrounded by his family. mr. mandela, became a symbol of hope around. world for his life long struggle against the apartheid system of racial segregation in his country. he spent 27 years in prison for defying that system. after his release he sought not revenge but reconciliation. mr. mandela went on to push for one of the most progressive constitutions on planet and became south africa's first democrat exly elected black president. he chronicled end of apartheid and mandela's election and serving as african correspondent for the bbc. tom, thanks for joining us today with your thoughts. and what were they when you first got the news that mandela pass ad way? >> i had a lot of emotions both at a personal level and a professional one. i had the same feelings that everyone had, this was absolute titan of the global stage whose like we'll probably never see in our lifetimes again. these sort of men only only come around everyone hundred years or some i have memories when i met him during the time i was in south africa, particularly of his personal warmth and humor. i re
. it was the site of nelson mandela's first speech after his release from prison. mr. mandela's body will lie in state. his body will lie there in state for three days of public viewing. and then his body will travel home. it is expected that jimmy carter, bush the elder, bush the younger will all travel to south africa to pay their respects, to the extent that their health allows it. >>> the scale and burial is expected to match those of pope john paul and winston churchill and people of that magnitude. when dan rather said he should be considered the greatest leader of the second half of the 20th semplg century, that's how viewed. >>> as the details of the arrangements for the next few days emerge, we will bring them to you right here. that does it for us. thank you for being with us. . >>> the world reacts to the loss of a global icon as news spreads of nelson mandela's death. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> this morning we'll take
and to reflect on his life and then as the week progresses after the memorial service tomorrow, mr. mandela's body will lie in state at the union building and on sunday next week, the state funeral, the official funeral in his homeland homeland, very remote part of the country but where he wanted to be buried so, again, an emotional week, a long good-bye, a lot of mourning, but also a time to celebrate this life. >> ron allen for us, thank you. >>> we move to washington where a budget deal finally sounds imminent, "the washington post" reporting the finishing touches under way with a sealed deal expected on capitol hill. the first successful budget, of course, since 2011 but it amounts to little more than a cease-fire according to "the post" because the deal would not significantly reduce the $17.3 trillion in debt. it wouldn't close corporate tax loopholes. it wouldn't fully replace sequester cuts. in essence it appears it would just avoid another debt crisis on capitol hill. >>> a rare trip to pakistan for chuck hagel. it is the first trip there for a pentagon chief in three years. his me
when he came in 1990 it was a big part of the visit. it said welcome home mr and mrs nelson mandela. one of the people who remembered that was the historian, mr billy mitchell. we talked about what that day was like in his memory. >> he was fully aware that all the people from civil rights fighters and to have his preps here, it meant a lot to all of us coming up out of problems. we were going through housing, education, things that of nature. his presence made us feel good, that there is hope. if this man could spend it that much time in prison and never gave in, so, of course, that would be reflected in the community that he was visiting. we were so positive by him being here, that there's nothing we can't do. >> tonight we have seen a lot of people stopping buy to share stories along each other. a few gathering under the apollo marquee. people have brought pictures by. a lot of pictures sharing memories of that day. so many people came by to see him. >> thank you very much. we are doing to take a break, but we'll look at nelson mandela's fight against apartheid coming up. convers
:00. >>> there is mr. nelson mandela a free man taking his first steps into a new south africa. >> south africa and the world mourns the loss of a hero and an icon. nelson mandela was 95. he spent decades fighting apartheid in his native south africa. >> i'm anne makovec live in the newsroom. as the world remembers mandela, we here in the bay area remember his-historic visit to the east bay and congressional legislation and divesting in south africa. >> reporter: bundle up. it is still cold out here. i'm kiet do. we have a live report. >>> yeah, freezing temperatures again around the bay area. freeze warnings are up. what a chilly day. this is the third day in a row of freezing temperatures showing up outside. some of those numbers dropping off under clear skies this morning into the 20s and 30s. now 23 in santa rosa. 28 in concord. 39 in san francisco. and 30 degrees in livermore. so a very cold start to the day again freeze warnings until 9:00. then clouds roll in in the middle of the day. plan on highs only in the 40s and 50s. this afternoon we could see a little rain. and then tonight, cold
johannesburg home. the last black president of south africa called mr. mandela a great man with great integrity. >> i think his greatest legacy to south africa and to the world is the emphasis in which he has always put on the need for reconciliation. >> reporter: the white house says president and mrs. obama as long w-z former president george w. bush and bill clinton plan to attend the memorial event. >>> stpraáp announced their own memorial for nelson mandela. it'll be held in the rotunda and former mayor brown will attend. >>> san francisco animal control today arrested a man suspected of drowning two cat that is belonged to a homeless woman. animal control officers say they arrested lee roy patterson on drum street after a struggle. police say patterson confronted the homeless work last month on pier 15. he threw her belongings right into the bay including her two cats. patterson is now facing two counts of felony animal cruelty and if convicted he could get -p up -- could get up to two years in jail. >>> continuing coverage of the unseasonably cold weather affecting those who make live
president of south africa called mr. mandela a great man with great integrity. >> i think his greatest legacy to south africa and to the world is the emphasis in which he has always put on the need for reconciliation. >> reporter: the white house says president and mrs. obama as long w-z former president george w. bush and bill clinton plan to attend the memorial event. >>> stpraáp announced their own memorial for nelson mandela. it'll be held in the rotunda and former mayor brown will attend. >>> san francisco animal control today arrested a man suspected of drowning two cat that is belonged to a homeless woman. animal control officers say they arrested lee roy patterson on drum street after a struggle. police say patterson confronted the homeless work last month on pier 15. he threw her belongings right into the bay including her two cats. patterson is now facing two counts of felony animal cruelty and if convicted he could get -p up -- could get up to two years in jail. >>> continuing coverage of the unseasonably cold weather affecting those who make live on the streets in san jos
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